The Detritus of History

All this talk of art has brought me back to an old thought that I think is in need of revival.  As you may or may not be aware, the other third of this blog is dedicated to old advertising.  It’s an entirely separate blog but made to look like just another part of this one by some menus (so if you want updates on that you’ll have to subscribe to it individually).  On it I try to sift through this rather large pile of advertisements I’ve acquired over the years and provide some random commentary. Basically, they’re just more and different writing prompts.

At some point during all this “collecting”, I sat looking at a large pile of ads and thought that there must be SOMETHING I could do with all these things.  For God’s sake some of these are 100 year old so I’m certainly not going to pitch them. So I scan them and save them off on Picasa and then somewhat sadly put the originals into a box.  Even this fate seemed sad to me though.  It occurred to me that the right and proper place for these was to display them but I certainly don’t have sufficient wall space for all the things.  Thus, for a few months I went on a tear of putting together collages and giving them to people at work.  Some were well received and some… well, not so much.  I tried my utmost to personalize them to the person receiving them so that there would be some connection but it is worth noting that sometimes that’s rather hard to judge.

As I sit here on Saturday morning I think it may be time to revive this little art form.  Anyone wishing to purchase such a thing need merely drop me a line and I’ll cogitate upon the prospect.

Folly"  (Gilbert Radium Clocks)

"Folly" (Gilbert Radium Clocks)

"Smoke" (High Rollers - 1970s)

"Smoke" (High Rollers - 1970s)

Grape-Nuts and Kelloggs (1910s)

Grape-Nuts and Kelloggs (1910s)

Maxwell Motorors (1910s)

Maxwell Motors (1910s)

Calculating Machines - 1910s, 1980s

Calculating Machines - 1910s, 1980s

Columbia Grafonola - 1920s

Columbia Grafonola - 1920s

Colgate Ribbon Dental Cream - 1910s

Colgate Ribbon Dental Cream - 1910s

Univac, Atari and 60s Kodak Movie Cam

Univac, Atari and 60s Kodak Movie Cam

1970s Commodore Calculator

1970s Commodore Calculator

11 Comments

Filed under personal

11 responses to “The Detritus of History

  1. Love the Casio ad. I find old advertisements like these to be so interesting. They really show how marketing & our common knowledge and education has changed as well as “the times”.

  2. morezennow

    Neato! (I love the past also, especially “retired” words including swell and nifty.) I really love the titles of your collages, too.

  3. Have you considered sending them into a museum? The National Archives just did a big exhibit on food advertisements from the early 1800s-on, and it was really popular. I’m sure some of these treasures would be warmly welcomed.

    Thanks for dropping by, by the way!

  4. it underscores strongly for me how advertising has changed. Not to mention the tools used.

  5. There is quite a market in old poster ads. We have a shop here that sells them for huge sums. I bought some 1920/30s China Journals and some of the ads are wonderful. I featured some Kodak ones in my own blog a few months back. Quite sad now with K in Ch11. It is fun to look through and see what is still around. Where will Apple be in 100 years?

  6. Pingback: The Detritus of History | Best Way to Promote Your Blog | BlogHyped

  7. I like the Grafonola. The whole collage and frame idea is genius!

  8. projectwhitespace

    You should totally start an Etsy shop. These are actually very cool. How much?

  9. I’m with Mark — the collage and frame idea is brilliant. That old Dalton ad from the 1910s is something!

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